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Fake News & Fact Checking: Identifying Fake News

This guide brings together a broad, yet selective range of information and resources for identifying fake news and verifying facts. #fake news #alternative facts

 

Decorative ocean header.

WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING AT?

Graphic on how to spot fake news.

Chart of the top six red flags that a news story is unreliable, etc.

There are more "red flags" that don't fit on this current graphic, but which are currently quite relevant:

1) Elevates the credibility of one credentialed expert who goes against the consensus of their entire credentialed expert peer group, e.g., one doctor vs. pretty much all the other doctors, one scientist against pretty much all the other scientists.

Chances are, if 1 out of 1000 doctors says one thing contrary to the other 999, the 999 didn't just get together in order to trick you.

2) Claims that being taken down for promoting misinformation is "censorship," which therefore, somehow, proves that the thing taken down is actually true.

There is no reason why something getting widely debunked and taken down would enhance the credibility of that thing.
 

Thin blue line.