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Procrastination in Academics: How to Begin

Strategies and inspiration to work with procrastination.

Supportive Materials

Video of workshop (coming soon)

Workshop calendar

 

 

Materials created and gathered by April Lane (ALane@csusb.edu) and Lisa Bartle.

Consider this...

Before you do anything, consider this

1. Make sure you understand the assignment.

Immediately ask questions or contact the professor. If you don't understand, you are likely to procrastinate.

2. Start with a topic you are interested in, if possible.

If you have flexibility in your topic, it is always better to choose a topic of interest.  A boring topic gives you reason to procrastinate.

3. Avoid selecting a topic that is too obscure or unique (unless you are writing your dissertation).

For your average undergraduate paper, topics that are too obscure can be difficult to find supportive information. That makes it more difficult, therefore more stressful, and creates a greater likelihood to procrastinate.

4. Sign up for, and attend, any workshops that will help you accomplish the project, such as researching, Zotero, citation styles (APA, MLA, Chicago).

 

Contact

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Lisa Bartle
Contact:
PL-053E
909-537-7552